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Macerated Stillbirth

Figure 6.13. This is a macerated stillborn infant with its placenta markedly enlarged as a result of Rh isoimmunization. There is gross swelling and pallor of all parts of the body and hepato-splenomegaly. Whereas previously isoimmunization was the most common cause of hydrops fetalis, now with the use of Rhogam®, nonimmune causes of hydrops fetalis are much

Figure 6.13. This is a macerated stillborn infant with its placenta markedly enlarged as a result of Rh isoimmunization. There is gross swelling and pallor of all parts of the body and hepato-splenomegaly. Whereas previously isoimmunization was the most common cause of hydrops fetalis, now with the use of Rhogam®, nonimmune causes of hydrops fetalis are much more common.

Figure 6.14. A pale hydropic newborn with Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn. Note the associated abdominal distension as a result of ascites and hepatosplenomegaly.

Figure 6.15. Nonimmune hydrops fetalis in an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Nonimmune hydrops fetalis has numerous causes including primary myocardial failure (cardiac malformation or arrhythmia), high output failure (anemia or arteriovenous malformation) and congenital infections.

Figure 6.16. Hydrops fetalis in an infant with ß-glucuronidase deficiency.

Figure 6.17. Purpuric lesions of the face and chin in an infant with Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn. Purpuric lesions represent extra-medullary hematopoiesis and give rise to the "blueberry muffin" appearance. The blueberry muffin appearance may be seen in infants with other conditions. Differential diagnosis includes ABO incompatibility, TORCH infections, and isoimmune thrombocytopenia.

Figure 6.18. Purpuric lesions on the back of the same infant as in figure 6.17 with Rh hemolytic disease are the result of dermal erythropoiesis.

Figure 6.17. Purpuric lesions of the face and chin in an infant with Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn. Purpuric lesions represent extra-medullary hematopoiesis and give rise to the "blueberry muffin" appearance. The blueberry muffin appearance may be seen in infants with other conditions. Differential diagnosis includes ABO incompatibility, TORCH infections, and isoimmune thrombocytopenia.

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Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

This fact sheet is designed to provide you with information on Bacterial Vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina.

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