Do Cysts Spontaneously Resolve In Male Infants

Popliteal Pterygium
Figure 4.91. A right-sided ectopic scrotum with left hemiscrotum in an infant with the popliteal pterygium syndrome. The scrotum is thus divided and there is cryptorchidism on the right. The testis is palpable on the left side.

Figure 4.92. In this male infant there is a urethral retention cyst (Epstein's pearl) with a hooded foreskin. Epstein's pearls are small retention cysts most commonly found on the palate but also seen on the penis or scrotum or the nipples. The hooded foreskin should not be confused with a shawl scrotum.

Hooded Foreskin Newborn Males

Figure 4.93. Another example of a male infant widi urethral retention cysts. These do not interfere with micturition and resolve spontaneously.

Figure 4.94. In this infant there is a white ridge on the scrotal raphe which probably represents retention cysts.

Figure 4.95. Redundant normal foreskin in a premature infant. The glans is normal and redundant foreskin is a frequent normal finding. Phimosis (narrowing of the opening of the foreskin preventing retraction) is physiologic in the normal neonate. Normal development releases the adhesions by die age of 2 to 3 years when the foreskin can be fully retracted. Parents should be told not to retract the foreskin in a normal newborn.

Figure 4.96. Balanoposthitis causing erythema and swelling of the prepuce and glans secondary to inflammation. Balanitis is inflammation of the glans and posthitis is inflammation of the foreskin. This change is frequently due to Candida infection but can occur with Trichomonas or herpes simplex virus infection. Balanitis should not be confused with a meatal ulceration, which is usually seen in circumcised male infants. In infants with meatal ulceration there is superficial ulceration often resulting from ammoniacal dermatitis. These usually heal spontaneously, but meatal stenosis may result.

Meatal Stenosis

4.95

4.96

Foreskin Retraction Toddlers

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Erythema NewbornsErythema Newborns

Figure 4.98. Epispadias in an infant with bilateral hydroceles.

Figure 4.97. This infant has an isolated epispadias. Note that in epispadias die urethral opening is on the dorsal aspect of the phallus. The opening may be either small or large enough to form a furrow bisecting the glans and penis. This is rarely seen as an isolated anomaly, but is more frequently seen in association with extrophy of die bladder.

Figure 4.98. Epispadias in an infant with bilateral hydroceles.

Figure 4.99. In diis infant who has a mild glanular hypospadias, the prepuce has failed to fuse, resulting in a "hooded" penis. Hypospadias is the second most common genital abnormality (after cryptorchidism) in males. The incidence varies from 0.5 to 0.75% and it occurs much less frequently in black infants. The types of hypospadias are comprised of 87% glanular or coronal, 10% penile, and 3% penoscrotal and perineal.

Figure 4.100. A glanular hypospadias in an infant with Russell-Silver dwarfism. This type of hypospadias is of minimal significance.

Figure 4.101. This 4-day-old term infant has a glanular hypospadias with an incomplete prepuce and has developed balanoposthitis (inflammation of the glans and prepuce).

Figure 4.102. Glanular hypospadias with a hooded foreskin in a term infant. Circumcision is con-traindicated in any infant with hypospadias as the foreskin may be required to repair the hypospadias.

Figure 4.100. A glanular hypospadias in an infant with Russell-Silver dwarfism. This type of hypospadias is of minimal significance.

Repair Incomplete Circumcision
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  • Yonas
    Do cysts spontaneously resolve in male infants?
    5 years ago

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