Breast Feeding During Illness

Many parents are concerned that breast-feeding has to stop if the mother gets ill. During most illnesses, including colds, flu, bacterial infections, and even surgical conditions, breast-feeding can and should continue. By the time you show symptoms of an illness, your baby has already been exposed to it. The best thing to do is to keep breast-feeding, because you have already started to produce antibodies. The baby will receive these antibodies through your milk, preventing infection of the...

Appendix A Organizations to Contact for Assistance

Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School Tel 888-233-2334 Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE) Comprehensive Epilepsy Center Boswell Building 300 Pasteur Drive Stanford, CA Tel 650-725-6648 Tel 800-EFA-1000 (332-1000) or 301-459-3700 Chapters of the Epilepsy Foundation are located throughout the United States. To find a chapter in your state, call the main Epilepsy Foundation number and they will direct you to the chapter nearest to...

Diabetes

Diabetic women should be closely monitored to make sure their blood sugar levels are normal or near normal. If the maternal blood sugar rises too high, the increased sugar crossing into the placenta can result in a large, overdeveloped baby with defects or blood sugar level abnormalities. Having a large baby can also result in injuries during birth and increase the need for cesarean delivery or other assistance during delivery, such as forceps or vacuum delivery. Women who are diabetic may also...

Breast Feeding Patterns

Breast-fed babies tend to feed more often than formula-fed babies do, usually 8 to 12 times per day. The main reason for this is that their stomachs empty quickly because human milk is so easy to digest. At first, your newborn will probably nurse every couple of hours, day or night. By the end of the first month, your baby may start sleeping longer at night. Let your baby feed on demand that is, whenever the baby is hungry. Watch for signals from the baby rather than the clock. The baby will...

Stage Three

The mild contractions of the third stage of labor generally begin 3 to 5 minutes after the arrival of the baby. The placenta is delivered during this stage. It may take only a few minutes or last up to 30 minutes or so. On average, you can expect it to take approximately 5 to 10 minutes. The first few contractions usually separate the placenta from the uterine wall. When the doctor sees signs of separation, he may ask you to push gently to help expel the placenta. This usually requires one...

SPECT single photon emission computerized tomography scanning

An investigation of the blood flow in the brain. Spike. A particular wave pattern in EEG that is typical of epilepsy. Spina bifida. Malformation of the spinal cord and spine. Spinal cord. An enlarged collection of nerve fibers and nerve cell bodies that exits the skull and travels through the vertebrae of the spine. Spinal fluid. Fluid that surrounds the brain and the spinal cord. Status epilepticus. A seizure that lasts longer than 30 minutes, or a series of seizures with no recovery of...

Issues to Discuss and Questions to

The following topics should be discussed during preconception counseling Weight The time to reach your appropriate weight is before you decide to have a baby. Obesity may put your pregnancy in a high- risk category. Women who are underweight sometimes ovulate irregularly, or they do not ovulate at all, making it difficult to get pregnant. Diet A healthy diet is necessary before, during, and after pregnancy. Folic acid This vitamin is essential in preventing fetal malformations, such as neural...