Fetal Risk Summary

Azatadine is not teratogenic in rats and rabbits given doses much higher than human doses (1). Published reports of exposure during human pregnancy have not been located. (See also Diphenhydramine for representative agent in this class.) In a surveillance study of Michigan Medicaid recipients involving 229,101 completed pregnancies conducted between 1985 and 1992, 127 newborns had been exposed to azatadine during the 1st trimester (F. Rosa, personal communication, FDA, 1993). A total of six...

References

Abbott Laboratories, 1996. 2. Schick B, Hom M, Librizzi R, Donnenfeld A. Pregnancy outcome following exposure to clarithromycin (abstract). Abstracts of the Ninth International Conference of the Organization of Teratology Information Services, May 2-4, 1996, Salt Lake City, Utah. Reprod Toxicol 1996 10 162. 3. Escobar LF, Weaver DD. Charge Association. In Buyse ML, ed. Birth Defects Encyclopedia. Volume 1. Dover,MA Center for Birth Defects Information Services, 1990...

Breast Feeding Summary

It is not known if capreomycin is excreted into breast milk. No reports describing the use of capreomycin in lactation have been located. Because most antibiotics are excreted, however, the presence of the antibiotic in milk should be assumed. The effects on a nursing infant from this exposure are unknown. However, less than 1 of an oral dose is absorbed systemically, so the risk, if any, to a nursing infant appears to be minimal. 1. Product information. Capastat. 1990. 2. Hamadeh MA, Glassroth...

Name Albendazole

Class Anthelmintic Risk Factor CM Albendazole is an orally administered, benzimidazole class, broad-spectrum anthelmintic used in the treatment of parenchymal neurocysticerosis caused by larval forms of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium. It is also active against the larval forms of Echinococcus granulosus. Plasma concentrations of albendazole are negligible or undetectable because of poor systemic absorption attributable to low water solubility and its rapid hepatic metabolism to the active...

Pregnancy and Drugs

Until the middle of the 20th century, most physicians believed that the uterus provided a protected environment for the fetus and served as a shield from the external environment. This belief was questioned in 1941 when an Australian physician, N.M. Gregg, observed that women who contracted rubella during the first trimester of pregnancy frequently gave birth to infants with specific anatomic defects, mainly in the heart, eyes, and ears. This finding forever shattered the concept held...