Breast Feeding Summary

Azithromycin accumulates in breast milk (11). A woman, in the 1st week after a term vaginal delivery, was treated with a single 1-g oral dose of azithromycin for a wound infection following a bilateral tubal ligation and then, because of worsening symptoms, given 48 hours of IV gentamicin and clindamycin. She was discharged from the hospital on a 5-day course of azithromycin, 500 mg daily, but only took three doses because she wanted to resume breast feeding that had been stopped during...

Fetal Risk Summary

Bethanechol is indicated for the treatment of nonobstructive urinary retention and neurogenic atony of the urinary bladder with retention. Reproduction studies in animals have not been conducted (1). The use of bethanechol in human pregnancy has been reported, but too little data are available to analyze (2). Breast Feeding Summary Specific data on the excretion of bethanechol into breast milk are lacking. The molecular weight (about 197) is low enough, however, that excretion into milk should...

References

Catalog of Teratogenic Agents. 6th ed. Baltimore, MD Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989 44-5. 2. Elia J, Katz IR, Simpson GM. Teratogenicity of psychotherapeutic medications. Psychopharmacol Bull 1987 23 531-86. 3. Product information. Elavil. AstraZeneca, 2000. 4. McBride WG. Limb deformities associated with iminodibenzyl hydrochloride. Med J Aust 1972 1 492. 5. Freeman R. Limb deformities possible association with drugs. Med J Aust 1972 1 606. 6. Australian Drug Evaluation...

Name Albendazole

Class Anthelmintic Risk Factor CM Albendazole is an orally administered, benzimidazole class, broad-spectrum anthelmintic used in the treatment of parenchymal neurocysticerosis caused by larval forms of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium. It is also active against the larval forms of Echinococcus granulosus. Plasma concentrations of albendazole are negligible or undetectable because of poor systemic absorption attributable to low water solubility and its rapid hepatic metabolism to the active...

Pregnancy and Drugs

Until the middle of the 20th century, most physicians believed that the uterus provided a protected environment for the fetus and served as a shield from the external environment. This belief was questioned in 1941 when an Australian physician, N.M. Gregg, observed that women who contracted rubella during the first trimester of pregnancy frequently gave birth to infants with specific anatomic defects, mainly in the heart, eyes, and ears. This finding forever shattered the concept held...